Take a Challenge With Me for a Successful 2017!

Take a Challenge With Me for a Successful 2017!

Ready for the Big Game? Not the Super Bowl. Are you geared up for the sales game? Are you prepared for the challenges, hurdles and victories in your 2017 personal Sales Super Bowl?  You’re not a bench warmer. Be a key contributor to your company’s success.  If you didn’t track when your customer’s lease ends, that’s no excuse to avoid contacting a company.

For at least eighty percent of the US, it’s cold during January and February. If you’re like me, the cold and snow is an excuse to avoid sales calls. “No one wants to see me on a snowy, freezing cold day. However, your phone works.

Even though your car may not be able to pile-drive through snowdrifts and traverse treacherous black ice covered roads, prospecting calls are always in season.

If you no longer want to see the same results as in prior years, join me in a challenge for 2017. We’ll have to make behavioral changes to see new results. Let’s make 2017 one of our best years ever.

Take five steps with me.

  1. I will make more “warm” prospecting calls. A warm call is one that is a result of some prior communication. Warm calls may be the result of a chance meeting at a networking event, a former customer that slipped through our sales net, a referral from a current customer or someone who has received one of company marketing letters.
  1. I will prepare a series of well-written marketing messages.
  1. I will commit to make a specific number of marketing calls each week. How many calls is the right number? It’s different for each of us. Write a goal that is consistently achievable. Powerful results come from consistent calling efforts and a written goal. Hold yourself accountable and reward your successes.
  1. I will create a three step follow-up process for those I meet face-to-face. The process must be easy to put into place or the temptation to abandon the plan will hit by February.
  1. For everyone from whom I collect a business card, I will:
    1. Send a brief note or email within 3-5-days of meeting them. Personalize the message. Add a detail from your conversation. Form letters are a waste of time. In 2012, we must do that which is unexpected.
    1. The second contact includes your company qualifications as it relates to your ability to solve the prospect’s biggest problem. . All communication is from a customer’s perspective focused on needs and the outcome that comes with your solution.
    1. Step three is a phone call. The message is problem and solution oriented. Ask open-ended questions. No drive-by spontaneous visits allowed.

We will have an improved 2017 if we work this plan together. Let me hear from you when you hit a bump. I’ll be on the journey with you.

Mary Redmond is a negotiation expert that provides workshops, presentations and coaching for companies and organizations.  She is a well-known professional speaker, author and consultant that can help you achieve success.

Negotiate When You Want to be HEARD: 5 Tips to Negotiation Success Part 5 of 5

Successful negotiators are prepared negotiators. Most of us are not born as great negotiators. We learn at an early age how to get what we want. By age two, a toddler knows how mommy and daddy tick and what it takes to get a cookie.

As we grow the stakes get bigger. We need to refine our old motto “I want what I want.” What we are really saying is “I want to be HEARD. Please listen to me. Respect my opinions.”

Five tips for a successful negotiation are contained in the acronym H.E.A.R.D.

This article is the last in a five-part series sharing essential steps to become a more successful negotiator in leasing as well as in life.

Step 5 – D – Document

A deal is not finished until it is in writing. Accurate note taking throughout the process makes this phase easy and painless. Immediately after the discussions are finished and the handshake consummates the agreement, the meeting summaries or contracts need to be drafted. Once drafted, the contracts are distributed to all involved parties.

Before anyone leaves the room, assign responsibilities to the participants regarding who is going to perform which steps, when they will be completed, and when the documents will be signed.

Time should be allowed for clarification of contract details and misunderstandings.

You just laid the foundation for the next meeting, negotiation or transaction. If all parties were treated fairly and each leaves with some of what they need, you have a win-win relationship. You will live to do another deal.

Mary Redmond is a top-rated female professional speaker, author, consultant and business coach.  She is a negotiation and body language expert that instills confidence, inspiration and expert knowledge that sets up her audiences for success!

 

Negotiate When You Want to be HEARD: 5 Tips to Negotiation Success Part 4 of 5

Successful negotiators are prepared negotiators. Most of us are not born as great negotiators. We learn at an early age how to get what we want. By age two, a toddler knows how mommy and daddy tick and what it takes to get a cookie.

As we grow the stakes get bigger. We need to refine our old motto “I want what I want.” What we are really saying is “I want to be HEARD. Please listen to me. Respect my opinions.”

Five tips for a successful negotiation are contained in the acronym H.E.A.R.D.

This article is the fourth in a five-part series sharing essential steps to become a more successful negotiator in leasing as well as in life.

Step 4 – R – Recommendation

You are ready to present your solution, proposal or position.

The recommendation phase is not called the Godfather Step. If you recall in the classic movie The Godfather, there is a scene in which one of the lead characters Don Corleone, played by Marlon Brando, tells his associates that he plans to make their opponents an offer. He’s going to make ‘em an offer they can’t refuse.”

There are debates over who should make the first offer. Go with your gut. I’ve done it both ways and ended with wins.

Mary Redmond is a top-rated female professional speaker, author, consultant and business coach.  She is a negotiation and body language expert that instills confidence, inspiration and expert knowledge that sets up her audiences for success!

 

 

Negotiate When You Want to be HEARD: 5 Tips to Negotiation Success Part 3 of 5

Successful negotiators are prepared negotiators. Most of us are not born as great negotiators. We learn at an early age how to get what we want. By age two, a toddler knows how mommy and daddy tick and what it takes to get a cookie.

As we grow the stakes get bigger. We need to refine our old motto “I want what I want.” What we are really saying is “I want to be HEARD. Please listen to me. Respect my opinions.”

Five tips for a successful negotiation are contained in the acronym H.E.A.R.D.

This article is the third in a five-part series sharing essential steps to become a more successful negotiator in leasing as well as in life.

Step 3 – A – Assess

Assess what you know and don’t know. Test possible options using phrases like “what would you say if…” or “let’s imagine if…” and then let the other person talk. This step allows you to help them visualize your preferred solution.

Answering a question with a question is a technique we learned at age two and still use in the world of “grown-ups.” Why? How? When? This can drive them crazy too so don’t overuse this technique.

If you are faced with someone who answers your question with a question, consider taking a break if this technique is used too often. The coffee pot or a “breather break” has saved many a negotiator from blowing their stack and the negotiation as well.

Mary Redmond is a top-rated female professional speaker, author, consultant and business coach.  She is a negotiation and body language expert that instills confidence, inspiration and expert knowledge that sets up her audiences for success!

Negotiate When You Want to be HEARD: 5 Tips to Negotiation Success Part 2 of 5

Negotiate When You Want to be HEARD: 5 Tips to Negotiation Success Part 2 of 5

Successful negotiators are prepared negotiators. Most of us are not born as great negotiators. We learn at an early age how to get what we want. By age two, a toddler knows how mommy and daddy tick and what it takes to get a cookie.

As we grow the stakes get bigger. We need to refine our old motto “I want what I want.” What we are really saying is “I want to be HEARD. Please listen to me. Respect my opinions.”

Five tips for a successful negotiation are contained in the acronym H.E.A.R.D.

This article is the second in a five-part series sharing essential steps to become a more successful negotiator in leasing as well as in life.

Step 2 – E – Engage

In the initial meeting, engage the opponent and assess what you know and need to know. What works best?

  1. Open ended questions are tools to get the other team talking. New information is gathered and other information is confirmed.
  2. Establish rapport and trust using what you know about the negotiator from your homework steps.
  3. Use active listening skills by showing interest in their position.
  4. Take notes. This shows you value what they say. Notes help recall what was said and who said it.
  5. Reading body language is a tool of a skilled negotiator. Those who master reading body language gain a look into the other person’s thoughts and feelings.
  6. Do not interrupt them. Allow them to talk freely.

Mary Redmond is a top-rated female professional speaker, author, consultant and business coach.  She is a negotiation and body language expert that instills confidence, inspiration and expert knowledge that sets up her audiences for success!

NO or I Don’t Know. Which No/Know is More Powerful?

NO or I Don’t Know. Which No/Know is More Powerful?

There is power in saying NO. Guru’s preach that if we say that simple one-syllable word-NO-we will:

  1. Establish office and project boundaries quicker.
  2. Manage time more effectively. Be a more successful, productive sales or territory manager.
  3. Control or eliminate excesses like eating unhealthy foods, drinking excessively or smoking.
  4. Be happier, more contented and fulfilled.
  5. Avoid over-volunteering for activities. You’ll recognize this pattern if your community nickname is “The Always Go-to Soccer Coach” or “Fund Raising Chair Extraordinaire.”

Brick and mortar bookstores contain huge Self-Help sections. Amazon lists 1.5 million book titles containing the word NO. If there are so many resources available to instruct us on how to say NO, why are we unable or unwilling to say that 2-letter word?

I believe it has a lot to do with difficulty in uttering another phrase, “I don’t know”, which is usually followed by the phrase, “I want to talk it over with….”

Somehow or at some time in our cultural development, it became imperative to respond immediately to a request with either a Yes or a No. Delay in decision-making was unacceptable. We feared that decision delay was a sign of weakness. Maybe it was an indication that we didn’t control our own destiny, personal lives, service territory, company future or world peace.

Uttering the phrase “I don’t know, I’ll get back to you on that” was as challenging as watching a cat passing a hair ball.

As children, if we were smart, we relied upon the excuse “I’ll have to ask my mom or dad for permission.” We maintained peace at home and avoided punishment when we asked an authority for approval of a scheme or plan.

As adults, who is our go-to for counsel? We’re fortunate if we have someone to consult prior to decision-making. The title we use is not as important as that there is someone we go to for guidance.

We may refer to them as an adviser, coach, mentor, business partner, counselor, colleague, spouse and occasionally attorney. Their title depended upon the issue. The point is that we have someone to discuss a decision with before saying yes or no. For some of us, we refer to our guide as a higher-power.

There is another possible challenge on the way to “I Don’t Know.” It’s the ego, our sense of self-esteem, self-importance and personal identity. A strong ego is an asset but can be a liability if it overrides humility.

When the ego is strong enough to admit that Smart People Say I Don’t Know, you are on your way to more personal fulfillment and success.

Mary Redmond is a top-rated female professional speaker, author, consultant and business coach.  She is a negotiation and body language expert that instills confidence, inspiration and expert knowledge that sets up her audiences for success!