Listening Sales Tool Box Tips for Success

Listening Sales Tool Box Tips for Success

Four Tips for Your Sales Tool Box are:

  1. Summarize Often
  2. Confirm and Clarify
  3. The 80-20 Rule
  4. Maintain Focus

Summarize Often

Recap your discussion with your client several times throughout the meeting. Your customer is not forgetful or inattentive. Summaries demonstrate momentum.

Five reasons to review are:

  1. Remind attendees you’re making progress.
  2. Everyone can celebrate little victories.
  3. Keep the end goals in sight.
  4. Demonstrate that good listening and comprehensions are ongoing.
  5. Encourage time management.

The 80-20 Rule

Make sure your prospect talks 80% of the time. While they share their needs and wants, remain quiet and take excellent notes. Sales people love to demonstrate how smart they are. “Smart Listeners Are Silent Listeners.”

The smartest person in the room talks 20% of the time and asks great open-ended questions that begin with the Five Ws; Who, What, When, Where and Why? In addition, the Big H – How.

Successful sales people remain engaged and demonstrate comprehension.

Confirm and Clarify

This step I nicknamed “The Parrott.” This technique came from marriage counseling. Years ago my husband and I wanted to improve our communication. The counselor asked each of us questions. He listened to our responses. Then we summarized what our spouse said.

Unfortunately, our “instant replay summation”were inaccurate. We listened with flawed filters. Frequently, what we reported hearing was incorrect. Additionally, as we gave our interpretative synopsis, the words selected and the vocal intonation changed too. Perhaps, in our replay, we wanted to impress our counselor with our dramatic acting skills. If this were an audition, that’s appropriate. In  listening skills practice, it’s not!

Also, don’t repeat a partner’s exact words or it sounds like you’re mocking them.

Parrots supposedly repeat their famous phrase “Polly Wants a Cracker” exactly as their owner said it. No variations. No dramatic inflections. Think of “The Parrot” next time your restate your customers’ requirements. Consider opening with one of these phrases:

  1. “What I heard you saying was…”
  2. “Let me see if I got this right.”
  3. “What you’re telling me is that the…”

Maintain Focus

Demonstrate listening using three skills:

  1. Take notes.
  2. Practice “Listening Body Language.” Lean forward and use the appropriate eye contact.
  3. Focus on your prospects Body Language and react accordingly.

Use these Listening Techniques and Tools and your sales will increase and your relationships will prosper.

Mary Redmond is a top-rated female professional speaker, author, consultant and business coach.  She is a negotiation and body language expert that instills confidence, inspiration and expert knowledge that sets up her audiences for success!

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TELEPHONE TIPS: It’s Not About YOU

TELEPHONE TIPS: It’s Not About YOU

Because there are no visual clues, you must sharpen your listening skills. The following are tools and tips I use to improve my ability to practice the HEARD Process.

Before Answering the Phone

  1. Take a deep breath. This helps to refocus and switch gears from other tasks at hand.
  2. Remove or minimize distractions such as your cell phone, IPhone or music source.
  3. Turn away from your computer to avoid the temptation to check emails during call.
  4. Silence audio computer email notifications.
  5. Greet the caller and SMILE. (They can hear this in your voice.)

The  “I’m here for you now and later too” Call:

These are suggestions for the second or third call with your colleague/client/customer. It occurs after the initial introduction call from the sales and/or implementation team. The purpose is to begin to build a trusting relationship:

  1. Be proactive. Don’t wait for the customer to call with a problem. Call them first.
  2. Ask if this a good time to talk? Sometimes you can hear noise or other distraction in the background or there is just a hesitation in their voice. It’s always good to ask permission to proceed.
  3. If the timing is not good, ask when they might be available to talk. Schedule the call and stick to your appointment.
  4. Explain your reason for calling. “I’m following up on ……..
  5. Your calling to help and make an offer to move a project forward by saying “What else needs to be done and how can I help you reach your deadline?”

Other helpful tips:

  1. If you work in a noisy and distracting environment, consider finding a more quiet space especially for a difficult call when listening well is critically important.
  2. Have a beverage available to sip in case your voice becomes dry. When we are nervous, our body automatically responds to stress with shallow breathing which can make our throats dry.
  3. Take notes to keep your mind from wandering as the call progresses. This is especially important when the prospective member has an accent or speech challenge.
  4. Prepare a checklist of items you need to cover with the person before completing the call prior to commencing the call.
  5. If the office is unexpectedly noisy, ask if you might call the prospect back at a mutually convenient time.

Mary Redmond is a top-rated female professional speaker, author, consultant and business coach.  She is a negotiation and body language expert that instills confidence, inspiration and expert knowledge that sets up her audiences for success!

 

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I Hear You But I Can’t See You

I Hear You But I Can’t See You

If you are like most sales people today, more than half of your customer conversations are via the phone, not in person. Excellent listening skills become even more important when visual cues are not available.

No matter what you sell; equipment, service plans, ink, paper or lease financing, the phone can be tricky. Good listeners are successful sales people.

I learn my biggest listening lessons in Improv Comedy Class. For the past three years, I’ve performed with an improv comedy troupe in my little town of Bonner Springs, Kansas. I do this just for fun, not money.

As a comedy improvisational actor, I attend classes and rehearsals for a total of fourteen hours per month. I commit that time to improve my stage performances. Why do I like Improv so much? One of the main reasons is that Improv makes me a better listener.

How much time per month do you invest in improving your business skills?

Good listeners are super sales professionals. Great communicators. Skilled negotiators. Listening skills transfer to my daily life with my customers, bosses, friends, spouse, and children.

This month, let’s take lessons from my comedy class and apply them to our customer telephone conversations. When visual clues are absent, sharpen your listening skills.

Lease sales tips when you call a customer are:

  1. Remove distractions such as ringing telephones. Put phones on stun.
  2. Turn away from your computer to avoid the temptation to check emails.
  3. If you work in a noisy environment, consider moving to a conference room or private area in which to conduct sales calls.
  4. Close your office door if you have one, to discourage others from entering and creating visual and auditory distractions.
  5. Have water available to sip in case your voice becomes dry.
  6. Take notes of your customer’s comments to keep your mind from wandering as the call progresses. This is especially important when there are multiple parties to the conversation.
  7. Prepare a proposed agenda for the call and distribute before conversation commences. Allow all parties to add to the agenda before the call begins.
  8. Send all call participants a summary of call assignments or commitments made and timelines for the next step to keep the selling process moving forward.

As you work on your listening and communication skills, success will follow you to all parts of your life.

Mary Redmond is a top-rated female professional speaker, author, consultant and business coach.  She is a negotiation and body language expert that instills confidence, inspiration and expert knowledge that sets up her audiences for success!

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Negotiate When You Want to be HEARD: 5 Tips to Negotiation Success Part 4 of 5

Successful negotiators are prepared negotiators. Most of us are not born as great negotiators. We learn at an early age how to get what we want. By age two, a toddler knows how mommy and daddy tick and what it takes to get a cookie.

As we grow the stakes get bigger. We need to refine our old motto “I want what I want.” What we are really saying is “I want to be HEARD. Please listen to me. Respect my opinions.”

Five tips for a successful negotiation are contained in the acronym H.E.A.R.D.

This article is the fourth in a five-part series sharing essential steps to become a more successful negotiator in leasing as well as in life.

Step 4 – R – Recommendation

You are ready to present your solution, proposal or position.

The recommendation phase is not called the Godfather Step. If you recall in the classic movie The Godfather, there is a scene in which one of the lead characters Don Corleone, played by Marlon Brando, tells his associates that he plans to make their opponents an offer. He’s going to make ‘em an offer they can’t refuse.”

There are debates over who should make the first offer. Go with your gut. I’ve done it both ways and ended with wins.

Mary Redmond is a top-rated female professional speaker, author, consultant and business coach.  She is a negotiation and body language expert that instills confidence, inspiration and expert knowledge that sets up her audiences for success!

 

 

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NO or I Don’t Know. Which No/Know is More Powerful?

NO or I Don’t Know. Which No/Know is More Powerful?

There is power in saying NO. Guru’s preach that if we say that simple one-syllable word-NO-we will:

  1. Establish office and project boundaries quicker.
  2. Manage time more effectively. Be a more successful, productive sales or territory manager.
  3. Control or eliminate excesses like eating unhealthy foods, drinking excessively or smoking.
  4. Be happier, more contented and fulfilled.
  5. Avoid over-volunteering for activities. You’ll recognize this pattern if your community nickname is “The Always Go-to Soccer Coach” or “Fund Raising Chair Extraordinaire.”

Brick and mortar bookstores contain huge Self-Help sections. Amazon lists 1.5 million book titles containing the word NO. If there are so many resources available to instruct us on how to say NO, why are we unable or unwilling to say that 2-letter word?

I believe it has a lot to do with difficulty in uttering another phrase, “I don’t know”, which is usually followed by the phrase, “I want to talk it over with….”

Somehow or at some time in our cultural development, it became imperative to respond immediately to a request with either a Yes or a No. Delay in decision-making was unacceptable. We feared that decision delay was a sign of weakness. Maybe it was an indication that we didn’t control our own destiny, personal lives, service territory, company future or world peace.

Uttering the phrase “I don’t know, I’ll get back to you on that” was as challenging as watching a cat passing a hair ball.

As children, if we were smart, we relied upon the excuse “I’ll have to ask my mom or dad for permission.” We maintained peace at home and avoided punishment when we asked an authority for approval of a scheme or plan.

As adults, who is our go-to for counsel? We’re fortunate if we have someone to consult prior to decision-making. The title we use is not as important as that there is someone we go to for guidance.

We may refer to them as an adviser, coach, mentor, business partner, counselor, colleague, spouse and occasionally attorney. Their title depended upon the issue. The point is that we have someone to discuss a decision with before saying yes or no. For some of us, we refer to our guide as a higher-power.

There is another possible challenge on the way to “I Don’t Know.” It’s the ego, our sense of self-esteem, self-importance and personal identity. A strong ego is an asset but can be a liability if it overrides humility.

When the ego is strong enough to admit that Smart People Say I Don’t Know, you are on your way to more personal fulfillment and success.

Mary Redmond is a top-rated female professional speaker, author, consultant and business coach.  She is a negotiation and body language expert that instills confidence, inspiration and expert knowledge that sets up her audiences for success!   

 

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Eight Steps to Sales Success

Eight Steps to Sales Success

2016 is almost over.  Close out the year on a successful note. Read below for some tips and inspiration to close some deals!

You have taken the time to get to know your customer equipment and finance needs and wants.  You feel the excitement. Adrenaline rushes through your body. It’s time to present your proposal. Lay your deal on the table.

  1. Rehearse: Proper preparation for your proposal includes role-play. This is not the time for improvisation. Be prepared for all possible objections.  Consider role-playing the sales appointment with a buddy, your boss or another sales rep. Practice like this is your Carnegie Hall debut, not a sale to the printer across town.
  1. Recommendation: During your presentation, introduce the lease payments as a daily expense. Also, use the concept of the customer’s return on their investment. Now is not the time to remind your customer about the total cash purchase price. Discuss the daily lease payment, which will allow customers to add helpful equipment accessories and software when they do not have the cash to purchase the extras. Extras increase your sale and only add pennies to the customers daily lease payment.
  1. Relate: Compare your customer’s current daily lease payment to your proposed and more affordable daily investment. You structured the lease to improve their cash flow. Their new lease payment is lower than their current payment and the equipment is less expensive to maintain.
  1. Review: Look at notes from previous customer meetings. Your solutions should solve the problems your prospect faces with their current equipment supplier or leasing company.
  1. Remove time constraints: Allow adequate time to present your solution and handle customer questions and objections. Never interrupt the presentation to catch a flight home or make your next appointment. Miss the flight or reschedule the second appointment rather than rush your customer. Allow time to properly close the deal.
  1. Remember: Do not take objections and questions personally. This is business. If you do not know the answer to their lease questions, equipment concerns or service issues, promise to promptly, find the answer.
  1. Respond: It’s essential to respond to customers objections quickly before fears and doubts develop. Always tell your prospect when you will return with answers to their questions.
  1. Relationship: People buy from people not brochures. Develop a trusting relationship with your prospect. Trust requires mutual respect.

You should know the easy compromises that you are empowered to make on the spot. However, depending upon the situation, you might want to defer to your business partner or manager before closing the sale the same day as the presentation.

In the heat of the moment, even seasoned negotiators give away too much and later regret their quick decision.

Compromise and concessions may be necessary before the deal is done. However, you have a fabulous foundation. You allowed time to develop a strong customer relationship. You are a problem solver. You are not someone who tries to talk customers into things they don’t need, want or can’t afford.

You are sales professional.

Mary Redmond is a top-rated female professional speaker, author, consultant and business coach.  She is a negotiation and body language expert that instills confidence, inspiration and expert knowledge that sets up her audiences for success!

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